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POOR ADOPTION & ENGAGEMENT WILL COST YOU

This is what’s been on my mind lately, as I speak with existing and potential clients about the issues they face getting employees to work in CRM.

 
1. Importance of an Adoption Plan
Along with an Implementation Plan, an Adoption Plan – that is a plan to make sure employees use what has been bought and paid for- is essential, no matter whether you are starting fresh or upgrading.  Many organizations simply put everything on hold while they focus on the upgrade process.  However, I’ve learned from highly productive Dynamic CRM clients, both plans should be crafted with End Users in mind.  By doing so, the project remains focused on how the CRM will support employees in their work and achieve overall company goals.  Many times we get lost in the “technology for technology’s sake” weeds.

If you look into the elements of a good Adoption Plan, you will read much about end user motivation and “What’s in it for me?”.  Explaining the Good News of CRM may not be enough and it is considered a best practice to explore and incorporate other motivations that may work within the culture of your organization.  Some motivations to consider as part of your Adoption Plan are:

 

• Appreciation from leadership
• Public Recognition before peers
• Rewards
• Peer pressure
• Competition
• Accountability

 

Finally, as with any plan, milestones, measurement and ability to adapt quickly will increase the chances of success.  Transparency and timeliness of data as spoken about by Satya Nadella at Convergence is everything.  Up to the minute reports – pictured below from CRMGamified’s Motivation Engine – easily accessed by all, will allow for decisions to be made immediately. Managers can see what is working, employees can see their progress and improve. Implementing an adoption plan with a motivation engine that measures and shares data as employees work in CRM should add to success for all!

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2.  More next time on Employee Engagement and what it means to the bottom line.  You may consider reading this NYTIMES article “When Employee Engagement turns into Employee Burnout”  about how high employee engagement, as it has been traditionally defined, is no longer sufficient to fuel the highest levels of performance

 

Debbie Rea

3 Tips to Become a Rainmaker in Sales & CRM

What are the best days and times to close sales? Why shouldn’t you drink coffee in a sales meeting? When having lunch with customers, why should you take the best seat at the table? Why should you never ‘be in a meeting’ when a customer calls? Why do breakfast meetings make rain?

These are some of the questions and rules brought up in the book ‘How to Become a Rainmaker. The Rules for Getting and Keeping Customers and Clients’ by Jeffrey J. Fox. This is a bestseller about selling and if you haven’t read it yet and you want to be above average, you should.

It was great information for me and so I wanted to share just three concrete examples where Mr. Fox’s advice + the use of a CRM platform like Microsoft Dynamics CRM and some gamification techniques, will help  you make rain!

1) Always Precall Every Sales Call

As Mr. Fox states, appointments with decision makers are relatively rare events. And yet Meeting with decision makers is crucial to getting the sale. Because of this, meetings (now very commonly held virtually) with decision makers must be carefully planned.

In his book, Mr. Fox says that “Ninety percent of all sales calls are won or lost before the salesperson sees the customer. This is because so few salespeople actually plan their calls…Rainmakers never waste a sales call: they always make a Pre call plan.”

 

What does that mean in the CRM world? Adopting, adapting and implementing a simple checklist like the book suggests into your CRM. It should be no more than adding some fields to the PhoneCall system entity to help you and your sales team make more effective sales calls and save valuable time for next phone calls.

Example:

  • Sales Call Objectives
  • Relevant questions to ask
  • What am I going to show in this call?
  • Anticipated customer concerns and objections
  • Points of differences with competitors
  • Which dollarization benefits to the customer will  I share today?
  • Expected results and next steps from the call
  • Expected surprises?

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‘A Rainmaker never calls on a decision maker without a written precall plan’, Jeffrey J. Fox.

2) Fish Where the Big Fish Are

It makes no sense to waste your time, money and energy chasing poorly qualified opportunities or low profit deals, aka small fish!

Making good use of CRM can substantially improve your accuracy when qualifying opportunities and best of all, decrease headaches and increase  revenue.  How can that be  accomplished? 3 very simple ideas:

  • Exploit the new Business Process Flows (BPFs) introduced with CRM 2013 (unfortunately I have seen very few customers  using it to its potential). Mandatory “Yes/No” questions aligned with Mr. Fox’s concepts i.e. ‘Current customer?’, ‘Contact is familiar with our products?’, ‘Want or need our products’,  ‘contact is decision maker?’, ‘I know about budget’, ‘We are first bidder’, ) combined with options (i.e. timeframe, purchase process) and stage may be very useful. Example:

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  • Leverage Business Rules, also introduced with CRM 2013. Visually display your rules that have been proven successful in qualifying  or disqualifying opportunities. By that, I mean proactively alert the sales rep the opportunity doesn’t fit with some proven criteria. For example, if your contact isn’t a decision maker, and you don’t know the budget then a suggested action is to diplomatically skip this one and invest the time in other opportunities.
  • Start your day with dashboards, not records! Dashboards (customized  internally ), can quickly tell you things like: your top opportunities, your top customers, # of opportunities won/lost by customer, $ in revenue by customer, # of phone calls by customer or opportunity, % quota achieved (if combined with CRM goals) besides of course, the most common charts like sales funnel. Work from dashboards and drill down to records, see the forest first, then focus on the right trees.

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  • Celebrate BIG sales! As Mr. Fox states the big sale is the trophy fish on the wall’, a phrase I couldn’t agree with more!. And I am very happy when customers tell us stories about how much their sales people love to see their picture on the widescreen through Hurrah! Leaderboards after a gong rings or a goal is scored celebrating a BIG SALE!

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3) Use the Point System Every Day!

I will re-state the author’s advice here:

‘There are four steps which are part of every sale:

  1. Getting a lead, a referral, an introduction to a decision maker.
  2. Getting an appointment to meet the decision maker.
  3. Meeting the decision maker face-to-face.
  4. Getting a commitment to a close (a purchase) or to an action that directly leads to a close.

Assign one point to Step 1, two points to Step 2, three points to Step 3, and four points to Step 4.”

 

Of course,the  number of points and everyday targets may vary from business to business but gamification of your CRM will allow you to assign points to important business processes and keep everyone focussed and on track.

We at CRMGamified offer tools to award and keep track of points and progress toward well qualified opportunities with great profit and revenue potential.  Gamification of your CRM helps you develop rainmakers and increase success for all.

 

Look how easy it is using Dynamics CRM and our Motivation Engine:

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That’s a pretty simple but common rule, including the creation of a record (in this case Lead), that meets some condition or conditions.

Very similar configuration can quickly be done for appointments, phone calls, opportunities and actually whatever system or custom entity you may be using in your Dynamics CRM to track sales data.

Oh! Who is going to make it rain this month? Visually design a badge and define a more difficult rule like generating 10 new opportunities this month with actual revenue >5.000 and closing 2 of them. You may want to include making certain number of phone calls or appointments as well.

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Moreover, if you’re in a management role, you may want to know in real time how your sales team is performing, encouraging the behaviors that drive more sales:

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While if you are in a sales position aiming to improve your stands, you will love to see how nice your trophies and your next upcoming missions look.

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There is a lot more to be done but I hope this post briefly helps to leverage Mr. Fox concepts through a real and fast way of bringing them to action.

Leave your comment below with opinions on how to improve sales performance with Dynamics CRM!

 

Cheers!

PP

@pabloperalta

MVP | Microsoft Dynamics CRM

PS:  Of course if interested, I will be happy to demo our Motivation Engine as well as our TV Leaderboards for Dynamics CRM any time for you. Just try the chat below or simply click Get a Demo link.

Meet us at Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference 2015!

It’s already July! Microsoft’s WPC 2015 in Orlando is just around the corner, and we didn’t want to miss the opportunity to let you know we’ll be there slide!

Don’t miss this great event, peers and partners from all around the world; it offers great sessions, experiences of other partners, and more, learning while having fun! And if you are interested in learning how to increase user adoption by applying gamification tactics in your Microsoft Dynamics CRM with our Motivation Engine or Hurrah! it’s the perfect chance!

Hurrah! Leaderboard: our web application allows you to increase speed of sharing data, increase motivation, engagement, communication and recognition! If you want to know more check our Top 9 reasons for choosing Hurrah! Leaderboard.

CRMGamified Motivation engine: our Dynamics CRM Add-on drives sales, improves customer service, and more!  Learn more about our Motivation Engine here!

Click here to learn more about Microsoft WPC, sessions, events, registration and more!
Contact us and let’s meet up!

 

 

CRM systems: The data entry nightmare

When it comes to adopting CRM systems, organizations face one big challenge or what we like to call the data entry nightmare.

The main purpose of installing a CRM system is to have all the critical information that comes from the customer interactions stored in a database, in order to improve many key business activities and outcomes, like product, customer service, revenue and profitability to name a few.

To do so entering that information into the database system is essential. That´s where the data entry nightmare begins: Without timely, complete and accurate information the system is useless. However, the job of those who are expected to provide the input is not data entry and they will resist doing so as they believe it slows down their work process and breaks their rhythm.

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So first of all, everyone using the CRM needs to have a clear idea of why the company decided to use the system and most important, what information is needed to achieve that goal.

Once that is clear, you will be able to identify Key Performance Indicators and evaluate those measures as well as make changes necessary to improve processes.

But going straight to the point, what will you measure, and improve if your people are not entering data in the CRM?

The answer is obvious: Nothing. You will measure nothing or at least nothing significant. However there is something you can do to encourage adoption of your CRM and kill the data entry nightmare.

You can incorporate a set of game mechanics in your CRM. What does this mean? It means you can create achievements and challenges with rules to reward your people for keeping CRM records up to date.

You can include levels, point, badges and rankings as real time feedback. You can create a one day challenge or monthly missions. Why would this work? Because people like having a goal and immediate feedback and recognition for their work. It’s human nature.

CONTACT US

Learn how you can kill the data entry nightmare with Hurrah! and our Motivation Engine!

 

From CRM systems to CRM playgrounds by The Octalysis Group

The Client Relationship Management (CRM) industry has been one of the first to embrace Gamification and one of the first to become somewhat disillusioned by it. While many Gamification cases delivered great short term results (high initial  user interest, sign-up and participation rates), they still failed to achieve the long term user engagement desired. Why did this happen and how do we keep CRM Gamification on the right track? Let’s explore the pitfalls and how to avoid them.

 

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One size does not fit all

Early adopters of CRM Gamification products opted for systems that were heavily based on motivation through letting users gain experience points, badges and leaderboards. Often these systems were one-size-fits-all off-the-shelf products that can be slapped on to your existing CRM product.

However, such a buckshot approach crucially forgets to acknowledge that different users have different preferences and motivational drives that trigger them into action. The majority of people won’t crave collecting badges and points forever just for the sake of it. We need to focus also on giving users autonomous choices and showing them how their choices worked out. Or making them feel that they are part of something bigger, more meaningful, a sense of purpose. Create some suspense, design for curiosity.

 

This is difficult to design for, and you cannot apply a one-size-fits-all approach here, but is necessary for long term user engagement (what we call the end-game, which caters for longer term users). For more on this check out the leading Gamification Framework Octalysis and how The Octalysis Group designs for long term engagement with the 8 Core drives of Motivation: www.octalysisgroup.com

 

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Take your user on a journey

Many Gamified CRM systems fail to recognize that we need to slowly build up the experience for the user. The first time someone uses the system is very different from the 100th time they interact with it. Look for example at how you have changed using Facebook since you started using it. Over time, user knowledge has increased and expectations are different. We say: using a product is not static, it’s an evolving journey!

 

In Octalysis, we recognize 4 Experiences Phases of a User’s Journey: Discovery, Onboarding, Scaffolding, and Endgame. Different phases should focus on different sets of Gamification features and appeal to different Core Drives. Just as it is not ideal to put a five-year-old on a streamlined superbike over using a small bike with training wheels, CRM systems also shouldn’t open up all 50+ features to a beginning user. Our brains hate it when we don’t have any options, but we also hate it when we have too many options. It confuses us, paralyzes us, and ultimately makes us feel stupid and overwhelmed. It is better to first discover and understand what features are the most valuable to the beginning user and just offer those. After that, allow users to slowly unlock new ones as they become familiar with the early features. Each new feature will then become a delight that users will appreciate and learn to use.

 

Collaboration wins the race, not Competition

In CRM systems there is often an emphasis on creating competition in order to get people to interact and make them productive. However, when it comes to long-term engagement metrics, collaboration is much preferable over competition. Both competition and collaboration draw their motivational pull from people feeling a sense of Social Influence & Relatedness (Octalysis Core Drive 5).  But there is a fundamental difference: competition creates urgency, stress, and short bursts of activities, but often leads to user burnout. In addition: competitions may create short term spikes to engagement but may in time stifle cooperation and decrease the quality of the work floor culture.

 

Collaboration on the other hand doesn’t push users as much, but users feel more empowered and will sustainably continue to commit to the Desired Actions within the CRM System, leading to more productivity in the long run. When we design for collaboration we design for users helping co-workers, group quests, mentoring, group recognition and enabling knowledge sharing.

 

Often we use a mix of competition and tangible rewards at the beginning of a CRM user experience (Discovery and Onboarding), and design more towards collaboration and creating autonomous choices in later phases of the experience (Scaffolding and End Game). If Gamified CRM products would take these lessons onboard, we are pretty sure the enthusiasm for Gamification will continue to grow as it does in other business areas.

 

To learn more about the 8 Core Drives and how to balance short and long term motivation in Gamification, read Yu-kai Chou’s book: Actionable Gamification – Beyond Points, Badges, and Leaderboards